President’s Message

Letter from the President, November 2022

This time of year, I feel like I’m doing a full 180 degree turn from what I was doing 180 days ago. I am pulling up the tomato plants that I so lovingly planted. Planted in the hopes they would all thrive and provide me with new and delicious fruit. But 180 days later, I am analyzing which varieties I won’t plant again – I mean the Lemon Drop Cherry tomatoes were tasty, but who needs an 8’ plant that produces way more fruit than anyone could possibly eat. (Though I did, as mentioned last month, can them like they do in Santorini). Then there’s the New Girl variety that was a real winner along with my always loved San Marzano. But what about the soil in the pot with the tomato that succumbed to some kind of fungus or blight? That new variety can’t really be criticized considering. And what do I do with that soil?

Outside of the raised vegetable beds there are more annuals to be pulled. 180 days ago, I loved the mystery plant from Ace that I put in the pots by the garage, but then the height of summer arrived, and the color faded, and it looked pathetic. Now it looks amazing again so I think, if my seeds take, I will grow it again but find a more favorable location next year. Also, portulaca has become my new bestie – managing to look good in pots in full sun all summer long. They will certainly be on display next year.

Speaking of next year, I promise myself I will put together that hot pepper/garlic spray to deter grasshoppers and maybe my iris leaves won’t look like lace doilies by the end of the summer. Nothing to be done about the Japanese Beetles, but I will continue to keep that soapy water bucket close by for my daily stalking & disposing of those horrible bugs.

There’s a saying I actually stenciled on my powder room wall that maybe we should put on tee shirts for Hoe & Hope:

“Nothing looks as beautiful as next year’s garden.”

Connie